Hey, Flo! It’s Square Dance Perfect Zero Module Madness!

Modules are choreographic sequences that can be linked together to form a larger “system,” that being the program that a modern western square dance caller creates to present more involved and complex variations of square dance calls that can be delivered by command to a set of dancers. The separate parts (figures) combine to construct a larger picture of interesting ideas that the dancers can then enjoy.

All dancers at some point desire to be a little more challenged than they had been in the past, it is only natural for people to want to try different things, however, the answer is not always more calls added to the dancing palette, but perhaps more of a change in combinations of calls that can satiate the hunger for more and different choreography for dancers. This is where modules can be implemented effectively.

Related:  Analytical Creative Choreography

The types of modules are used together to instill a uniform and dependable program of calls that the caller can rely upon to:

  1. Provide consistency in calls
  2. Provide fun interest for the entire assembly of dancers
  3. Eliminate dependency on the dancers for square resolution (sight calling)

For the caller, combining different ideas that start in a certain position, such as Facing Lines of four, and end in a Facing Line of four with everyone in the precise same position on the floor, is labeled a Perfect Zero Module. Some call this a Geographic Module. The idea is that all dancers on the floor end EXACTLY where they started. It is as if they made up a round trip route leaving and returning home on Google Maps or Mapquest. Interest for the dancers is brought about by the caller combining a set of calls that provide nice interesting choreography and eventually return the dancers to where they started.

This first Zero Module combines Walk & Dodge with Tag the Line which immediately follows. This is a nice change from the usual Partner Trade:

1p2p Lines:
Pass the Ocean
Recycle
Veer Left
Couples Circulate
Half Tag (the Line)
Walk & Dodge
Tag the Line – Leads Turn Back
Swing Thru
Boys Trade
Boys Run
Couples Circulate
Bend the Line

This second “Zero” is not really too hard for the dancers, unless they are weak on Dixie Style and Left Handed moves:

Box 1-4 (Zero or Corner Box):
Slide Thru
Right & Left Thru
Dixie Style to a Wave
Boys Trade
Left Swing Thru
Girls Run
Boys Trade
Bend the Line
Slide Thru

This third sequence offers a simple Single Hinge, a U-Turn Back for the Girls in an Ocean Wave, a Tag the Line combined with an atypical Bend the Line. I find that all Mainstream dancers struggle with Bend the Line when it is called from anything other than the normal 2-Faced Line with Boys on the end or normal Lines Facing Out. The majority of square dance callers need to use this type of positioning for the dancer’s sake. It is all about strengthening the dancer’s ability:

1p2p Lines:
Slide Thru
Touch a Quarter
Split Circulate
Single Hinge
Girls Trade
Boys Circulate & Girls U-Turn Back
Couples Circulate
Tag the Line – Face Right
Bend the Line
Star Thru
Trade By
Right & Left Thru
Swing Thru
Girls Circulate & Boys Trade
Boys Run
Couples Trade
Couples Circulate
Bend the Line

The last figure uses a Spin the Top out of a Boys Circulate & Girls Trade. Not called together this way very often, but it will turn some heads, I promise you it will. Consider using this combination for a workshop tip to acclimate dancers to move through unusual ways to Spin the Top. This combination is followed up with a Dixie Style sequence that provides a clockwise direction Girls Circulate & Boys Trade from a 2-Faced Line. Then that leads into an unconventional Bend the Line that works in flow with the Rollaway Half Sashay:

Box 1-4 (Zero or Corner Box)
Swing Thru
Girls Circulate & Boys Trade
Spin the Top
Right & Left Thru
Dixie Style to a Wave
Left Swing Thru
Girls Run
Girls Circulate & Boys Trade
Bend the Line
Rollaway Half sashay
Touch a Quarter
Boys Run

The basic premise of a module is to aid the caller to compose a strong and interesting program that will turn on interest for all dancers on the floor. Consider this, “The dancers can only be as good in ability as what you call to them.” In other words, call something that will intrigue, impress, and improve the dancers’ strengths while dancing to your vocally delivered modern square dance choreography.

Related:  Ridiculously Obvious Game-Changing Singing Call Figures

Give it some thought…

Take some time to compose some choreographic ideas…

And then program the ideas into something

powerful at your dance!

Contact me if you have a question or you would like some help in learning how to create choreography for modules. I would be glad to help!

Best Regards,

Shaun Werkele

303-250-4735

 

 

Mission Statement: The purpose of this post is to create a greater visibility of the square dance activity for future dance population growth on a national and local level. The coaching information provided here serves as a source for square dance caller education training and perspectives on dance. Future articles will be developed to improve the programs of square dancing and how those learning to square dance call can help contribute to the preservation of both modern western square dancing and traditional square dancing and to aid in the growth of the square dance activity

 

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For Square Dance Callers: MY TIME LOG Checklist

Original and Effective Program Launched For Square Dance Callers: MY TIME LOG

Lots of modern western square dance callers have problems with slow progress and little improvement over years of calling. Making significant progress is a huge hang up that many ordinary people can get stuck in, not even considering the complexity of square dance calling.

It is a musical art that requires a discipline and a structure to advance in overall abilities and development. Many newer callers unnecessarily struggle with their calling. Why? Because they work at improvement ineffectively. They practice inefficiently. And they are not organized in how they pursue their advancement.

So what I have done is to put together a simple and focused regimen for callers with a highly structured schedule that maximizes efficiency and plans out your practice session for you. This combines several areas for necessary improvement. Timing, choreography writing, song programming, and effective practice sessions all are combined and controlled with two very basic worksheets that I have created aimed at forcing good discipline and making improvement easily attainable. The program is a daily practice schedule that makes it usable for everyone at whatever skill level they call at, whatever needs they might have, or even whatever square dance program they need to put together. Go here to get the program sheets. It is free for all!   MY TIME LOG:

MY TIME LOG For Square Dance Callers

Total and overall improvement and ultimately, mastery, all come from breaking the rut and practicing in a way that is different every time you turn on your equipment and practice. Every time you practice it should be totally different from the time before. Many people think that practice is the same things over and over until they “have it down,” But this is only partially true.

Generally, you should NOT practice the same things everyday. You will not improve on the level that is optimal for advancement of overall ability. Think about a session musician. Everyday they are hired to play a musical part on a song differently! Every time. That is the job!

Besides, practicing the same songs over and over is boring and you develop bad habits of doing the same thing over and over. This is not good, either! Strive for a general rule of practicing smarter, not harder, and watch and see what happens!

Related:  25 Alive Choreographic Challenge!

The MY TIME LOG program (it is free!) requires that you change songs daily. You change the program daily on figures for those singing calls practiced. You will use different choreography on hoedowns daily. Timing, which is taken for granted by most, is worked on daily in this program. This is free so check it out on the page link above.

Related:  Modern Western Square Dance Calling: Timing is EVERYTHING!

You can print these two daily MY TIME LOG worksheets off and use both to track your activities by checking the boxes as you practice. One other great thing about this practice schedule is it forces you to use other songs than you normally practice and more songs and different figures and more figures that push you into new rehearsing territory. Especially the music because the songs change EVERYDAY!

And you will record yourself in your practice session everyday. And you will see improvement, I promise you will!

If you cannot or do not feel that you can do this then attempt to change at least one song a day and record the performance on a tape and save and review and compare the performances at the end of the week. You still should ALWAYS record your practice sessions and critically review them for improvement. That is the main point of practicing singing calls twice in a practice session.

After the first time through the song you should listen to the recording you have made and then see where you want to improve upon your first performance. Look for things that you want to  improve upon, target them, then practice and record the song a second time and see if you improved. Be critical, ask for other people’s feedback and take their input and apply it so that you indeed see notable improvement.

Related:  Ways to Improve as a Square Dance Caller

Back to explaining how MY TIME LOG works. MY TIME LOG is essentially a daily time log that will propel your improvement by 4 times as to not having a good plan in place. In other words, aimless and unorganized practice sessions. The flexibility and efficiency in your practice time, combined with more effective focus on what will truly improve your square dance calling ability is what this schedule will provide.  This will guide you to a more successful path that is more focused. You will not be wasting time on things that are not directly related to your goals – better choreography, better command of calls, overall better performances. I can think of no better way to harness your time and energy in the most effective way possible.

Here are the areas of study and practice you will find on the free MY TIME LOG:

DAILY HOMEWORK FOR SQUARE DANCE CHOREOGRAPHY

PRACTICE 4 MINUTES—TIMING (2/4 DRUMBEAT) (THIS IS A WITHOUT MUSIC EXERCISE)

MICROPHONE (RECORDED) PRACTICE TIME SCHEDULE

HOEDOWN SONGS

SINGING CALL SONGS

(THE SONGS CHANGE DAILY)

“ONE THING”

This is the part that WILL PUSH and foster improvement. A new figure always added to practice regimen at end of practice session that is either a hoedown choreographic figure or a new singing call figure.

The whole key to this structure is the rotation of choreography and the square dance songs that you use. As I mentioned before, they change daily.

You do not need to unnecessarily struggle if you are a new caller. And if you are an experienced caller then use this to pull yourself out of your rut. Overcome your roadblocks – to being able to call whatever you want to, perform a larger catalog of musical material, and transcend your choreographic limitations!

MY TIME LOG (DID I MENTION IT IS FREE?) YES, IT IS FREE! CHECK IT OUT!

Feel free to call me. I would be glad to help you out, whether you need coaching or just a pointer or two.

Shaun Werkele

303-250-4735

 

 

 

Mission Statement: The purpose of this post is to create a greater visibility of the square dance activity for future dance population growth on a national and local level. The coaching information provided here serves as a source for square dance caller training, education, and perspectives on dance. Future articles will be developed to improve the programs of square dancing and how those learning to square dance call can help contribute to the preservation of both modern western square dancing and traditional square dancing and to aid in the growth of the square dance activity.

 

Square Dance Calling: Understanding Timing & Musical Phrasing

The most important and effective part of any square dance caller’s improvement is to focus on their phrasing and timing. Timing is the very cornerstone of incredible calling and the start of mastering this begins with an understanding of how these two elements of music work together.

Musical Phrase

A melodic phrase is a group of notes that not only sound well together, a good musical phrase conveys a definite melodic combination of musical notes. In other words, a phrase is a series of notes that sound complete even when played apart from the main song. Think of it as a chapter in a book. Or a short path on a trail and all of the paths make for a long trail for the hiker to travel upon. Phrases combine to create a theme that we call a composed song’s melody.

Another noteworthy thing about musical phrasing is a phrase is one idea that when combined with other phrases can create complete melodies or even rhythmically based figures. It generally takes more than one phrase to make a complete melody.

For square dance calling, a good and simple way to think of a vocally produced musical phrase is it is as short as a single word and it can be as long as the length that a singer chooses to sing a phrase in one breath of air. This is a typical unit of both musical meter and musical rhythm – both are tied to keeping in time with the beats of music in a composed melody or set of melodies, and this is what makes the enjoyment of music possible.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phrase_(music)

Musical phrases are pleasing to the ear because they resolve in the view of the listener, and since they resolve, there is closure and completion of the sounds, much like the completion of a sentence in a written body of work. They are a composition element, which is taught in music theory, to make the music more organic, natural, and attractive. Keep in mind that the goal of a musical phrase is to peak interest in the listener and their enjoyment of the music first, on an aural level, and then second, on an emotional level.

Square dancers are listeners first, so improving your phrasing is one of the best ways to polish up your calling abilities. The part of the music that callers utilize for the melodic parts of choreography – delivery (calls and patter) – is based both on the rhythm of the music and the musical notes within the song itself. All traditional hoedown music provides a basic chord progression that is repeated every 16 or 32 beats in a melody. This music contains many phrases that link together and they are repeated or retold in altered instrumental stylings of the parent melodic phrase with prominent melody instruments such as the fiddle or the guitar. Musicians perform the musical piece to create a unique song with evolving and changing sets of variation within the final structure. And that is how phrasing in a hoedown song works.

Because of this repetitive melodic phrasing in square dance hoedown music, the role of the caller is laid out by fitting his vocal phrasing to work with the beat and the musical phrases that exist in the song’s melody.

The Bass Carries The Weight…

The bass parts of songs carry the root note in a musical chord with third notes and fifth notes alternating on the 2 and 4 beats of all traditional square dance music. The bassline in a song follows the chord pattern and most patterns are usually very simple and repetitious.
A bass instrument in a hoedown is a square dance caller’s best friend. The bass being played is a fantastic guide for timing and showing what the possibilities are for great phrasing. The most basic way to call is to marry the movement of the bass with your delivery of the square dance calls that can then be in harmony with the hoedown song’s chord structure.

This can be a simple called melody that you turn into:

  1. Melodic phrasing (vocal delivery of calls) in use with the
  2. Rhythmic aspect of your patter delivery.

Start off by trying this simple exercise:

Take any hoedown song with a solid strong bass end to it and isolate the bass frequencies. Adjust the bass control by turning it up and you will more clearly hear the bassline for the hoedown song. Listen to the song enough times that you can hear the chord changes resolve, come to an end, and then the music will start to repeat. The phrasing of the musical sequence repeats itself.

Next, try to sing along in unison with the bassline note for note verbatim or as close as you can, then turn off the music halfway through the musical phrase and see if you can sing the remaining notes that finish the bass sequence of the hoedown’s melody. This is much more difficult, particularly if you are weak at this time in carrying a melody. Do this until you can at least somewhat duplicate the bass notes with “dum dum” or “Doo doo” vocal singing of the melody without the music playing at all. Practice the simple changes without hoedown musical accompaniment until you have a great feel for the music and the complete chord changes that are carried through the bass instrument.

The Element of Timing

Expanding upon this idea allows you to practice more variety in your vocal delivery by getting back to the most basic of all square dance timing, the one-beat. It is the single most important musical element that square dance callers use to achieve great timing in their delivery of square dance calls. Now practice only saying “one” with every first beat of music in the same 2/4 rhythm of hoedown music. By following the actual pitch of the musical chord with the one-beat, you can focus on being in time and also being in pitch with the music.

Use a traditional 2/4 rhythm hoedown piece, and pick a slower tempo and work on the one-beat with “dum,” “one,” and “doo.” I will use the vocal “ten bounce” on the ones a lot of the time when I do this exercise. You must strive to match the tempo with the hoedown’s beat on the one-beat and the third beat, the three-beat. But more than that. You also need to match the PITCH of the notes that the bass is carrying for the traditional hoedown song.

Related:  Improve Your Vocal Technique

Next, take this a step further and add the two and four beats by saying “one two, one two” in pitch with the bass of the song. Practice a bit.

Add another element of phrasing by expanding your delivery by switching up to “one-two-three-four” for the song and make sure that you follow the one-beat. To ensure that you do indeed follow the one-beat, start on the very first beat of the square dance music after the introduction of the song. This is usually 8 beats, although it can vary and only be 4 beats or it can be more than 8 beats, usually 16 beats, on rare occasions 12.

Delivering the Calls

This is the point where the musical phrasing really begins!

Use the beats of music and say in time as quarter notes (four notes at a time):

ONE>TWO>THREE>FOUR>ONE>TWO>THREE>FOUR>ONE>TWO> THREE>FOUR

This will even work with a 2/4 beat song even though you are saying, “one-two-three-four.” This is because a count of four rhythmically falls in place with the one-two count in a 2/4 meter of music just as well as 4/4 timing. Practice this until you can speak/sing with the music for 12 beats. Then mentally count for 4 beats while you take a normal breath. Then repeat the ONE>TWO>THREE>FOUR  for another 12 beats. This makes a timed out musical phrase of 16 beats.

(If you cannot feel the musical phrase or the one-beat, then check into getting some help from a musician in counting music.)

Next, count the music in eighth notes. Say in time and start on the “one”:

ONE>and>TWO>and>THREE>and>FOUR>and>ONE>and>TWO>and>

THREE>and>FOUR>and>ONE>and>TWO>and>THREE>and>FOUR>and>

After you feel that you have a good feel for the musical phrasing of the hoedown music, you can begin creating your own phrasing by calling in rhythm to the one-beat.

Here is a great beginning exercise that practices the reinforcement of three things:

    1. It builds a practiced habit of feeling the one-beat
    2. It reinforces calling in pitch to the music
    3. It encourages growth of musical phrasing in your delivery:

ONE>and>TWO>and>THREE>and>FOUR>and>
Bow  to    the    Part     nerrr

ONE>and> TWO>and> THREE>and>FOUR>and

And   the    Cor – ner     of        the   hall

Both the phrasing and the timing is dependent upon starting on the one-beat. All dancers depend on your timed delivery so that they dance in time to the music. And remember, good phrasing and timing is ear pleasing, too!

Related:  Modern Western Square Dance Calling: Timing is EVERYTHING!

Next, you can work on some timed musical phrases as  they work in square dance calling. The bolded words in the following patter call line up with the numbers above them (the beats):

ONE>  and> TWO>and>THREE>and>FOUR>and>ONE>and>TWO>and>
Grand Right and a Left around ago,                     Hand over Hand a –                  THREE>and>FOUR> and>ONE>and>TWO>and>THREE>and>FOUR>and
rouuuund    and      a      Meet that  Lady and   You   Prome nade ’round

 

Continue practicing for as long as it takes to easily match the rhythm in time to the beat.

Related:  How to Master Square Dance Calling

An Overview

Every delivery of every call has its own unique meter and musical phrase due to the words used and how they are grouped in the delivery. The only real way to get good phrasing is to practice hoedown square dance calling an awful lot and learn to call originally; or take existing square dance material and make it yours.

Square dance calling as an art begins at understanding basic timing and phrasing and using those principles to fit the commands into a musical phrase as the dancers execute the calls. Over time, you will develop a stronger sense of the beat and delivering as many calls as you can on the one beat as possible. Most callers combine both of these approaches to grow their abilities as a caller.

Remember, working hard on timing and phrasing of the delivery of the calls will provide the dancers with some of the best calling that they could ever dance to and make you sound great!

Shaun Werkele

303-250-4735

 

 

 

Mission Statement: The purpose of this post is to create a greater visibility of the square dance activity for future dance population growth on a national and local level. The coaching information provided here serves as a source for square dance caller training, education, and perspectives on dance. Future articles will be developed to improve the programs of square dancing and how those learning to square dance call can help contribute to the preservation of both modern western square dancing and traditional square dancing and to aid in the growth of the square dance activity.

 

Ridiculously Obvious Game-Changing Singing Call Figures

Game-changing decisions can truly alter the overall outcome and change the potential for positive changes in anything. Think about a game that had an game-changing call by an umpire or referee and how that affected the fans watching, the players playing, even the sponsors and their motivations!

Last time I checked, square dance callers were still always looking for easier ways to call a dance. I cannot blame anyone for pursuing the easy way around things. Just keep this one thing in mind, though: What you choose to call is a game-changer for everyone just like the officials in a sports game.

So give some serious thought to what you choose to reduce the work of sitting down and creating square dance choreography for your program.  Rely on past figures as you need to, that is OK. It takes experience to write effective and intriguing square dance choreography. Figures that have been composed by other callers and have proven themselves as being interesting and they still provide a captivating shortcut to delivering choreographic variety for all dancers. Incorporate as much as you wish. But please also focus on good variety and offer as many calls as you can in your night’s dance.

Generally, a caller should pair easy songs in melody with easy choreography figures and along with that step the choreography up in complexity as the dance progresses. Make it possible for the dancers to improve their personal dancing ability with more difficult figures throughout the dance.

You can instill this progression in choreography by programming both the hoedown portions and singing call figures throughout the night. Introduce creative combinations of calls that you want to call and then put those ideas back into a singing call figure or two to create more excitement for the dancers and expand their potential in dance.

Here are four different and unique Mainstream singing call figures for some unique choreographic twists that can be used in a game-changing program, if you choose to focus on putting one together.

Make sure you run through a few different routines with several different singing call songs thereby presenting great timing and delivery in your presentation of the choreography:

 

CALLING TIP! Highly experienced callers know and “see” visualizations of the dancers and their positional relation choreographically to one another in a square.  This will set up a confident air that carries the overall energy throughout the night. Understand the positioning and end result of all calls you want to present for this reason.

Heads (Sides) Square Thru
Right & Left Thru
Swing Thru
Boys Run
Ferris Wheel
Centers Veer Left & Veer Right
Everybody Veer Right
Wheel & Deal  Swing Corner & Promenade

Heads (Sides) Promenade Halfway
Walk in Square Thru
Circle 4 Halfway
Veer Left
Couples Circulate
Girls Trade
Wheel & Deal
Sweep a Quarter
Pass thru
Swing Corner & Promenade

Heads (Sides) Lead Right
Circle Four Halfway
Veer Left
Half Tag (the Line)
Walk & Dodge
Partner Trade
Pass the Ocean
Boys Circulate
Swing Corner & Promenade

Heads (Sides) Lead Right
Swing Thru
Spin the Top
Recycle
Pass the Ocean
Boys Circulate
Swing Thru
Boys Trade
Swing Corner & Promenade

 

This last figure lends the nice change of a Recycle after the Spin the Top. Consider using it in your square dance calling program. Think about your choreographic program. Instill some bold moments. You owe it to the dancers!

 

Best Regards,
Shaun Werkele
303-250-4735

 

 

 

Mission Statement: The purpose of this post is to create a greater visibility of the square dance activity for future dance population growth on a national and local level. The information provided here serves as a source for square dance caller education training and perspectives on dance. Future articles will be developed to improve the programs of square dancing and how those learning to square dance call can help contribute to the preservation of both modern western square dancing and traditional square dancing and to aid in the growth of the square dance activity.

Square Dance Callers: Analytical Creative Choreography

I tend to lean on the thought that a great deal of ANALYTICAL people develop and find excellent solutions to problems all the time. While the CREATIVE types ask bold questions about things. It is something that cannot be helped, it seems that artists of all walks of life think in such a way. But when these two types of people meet up and combine forces, real magic starts to culminate. This is simply because the best question is asked. And then it becomes a beckoning idea that needs to be answered with the best solution. The strength of this situation can drive a powerful response that is based solely upon the effort of constructing a blueprint to solve the question at hand.
— the CREATIVE has the vision to ask questions that reach deep, and the ANALYTICAL person responds by troubleshooting and designing the function.

Sometimes this is a team up between two separate individuals. Sometimes the artist asks the question and then they “change hats” to the become the designer and work through to a solution. As for myself, personally, I find my self wearing both hats often on the same projects.

For myself, creating goes a long way back. My square dance path is a little non-traditional. I was always an artistically adventurous person while growing up and I was always a little bit different from other kids that I grew up with. I was attracted to and loved drawing and I even went to some art classes to study the possibilities that the art medium had to offer for me through expression. A couple of years later, I got into square dancing with my family, and after graduating from the local square dance caller’s association caller’s school at age 14, I got involved with the Advanced and Challenge levels of square dance. Fortunately for me I have a deep background in the creative realm.

Creating – an illustrator is mainly thought of as someone who draws a lot. But that is a little too narrow of a viewpoint and it lacks an understanding of the nuts and bolts of creating. A square dance choreographer assembles a set of figures or even combines a set of already existing parts that when combined create something new and usually different than anything that was ever used as a square dance “idea” before.

Related:  Making Minor Changes in Singing Calls

To create choreography, any square dance caller out there can combine a few calls together and command something that has “danceability.” This is a technical ability that is not too involved – one does not need to be the “Fred Astaire” of square dance, but it is important to possess a foundation in the basic mechanics of choreography –  what works and what does not.

What is necessary to square dance call fantastic choreography is the conceptual ability to create like a designer – as an illustrator who interprets a challenging dance combination that is interesting, yet achievable by most dancers on the floor – keeping in mind that all combinations of calls and figures need to reasonably flow and the square dance calls are not too difficult to execute.

Related:  Getting Dancers Through Difficult Choreography

A choreographer has to provide unique ideas that often represent a little puzzle solving for the people dancing without “blowing their minds” or “breaking them down” as a unit of eight dancers.

Some of my first few choreography projects when I was younger involved creating different ideas than what I had first assembled the ideas, they were not very dancer-friendly. Over time, through education and experience, I found that writing choreography really elevated my skills in putting together great choreographic ideas. At the time, there weren’t many dedicated and young square dance callers that called at the Advanced and Challenge levels of square dance. Eventually, I transitioned back over into Mainstream and PLUS levels of square dance where I could be more of an entertainer and never looked back. But I never forgot the importance of fully understanding the mechanics of the calls and how to combine them well.

Related:  7 All-Time Most Important Square Dance Calls

Writing square dance choreography is a creative process that uses both analytical and creative ideas. Having one constructive piece but not the other is extremely limiting. A great choreographer in all kinds of dance balances and sharpens both.

If you have more of the art or draftsmanship person in you, this might limit the technical and difficult calls that you combine and ultimately create. If you’re more of a conceptual thinker but lack an artist’s fundamental creativity, it limits the way that you can express your choreographic ideas in, for example, singing a figure in a singing call.

Related:  Square Dance Singing Calls: Practicing Basics

Creative figure for a singing call:

Heads (Sides) Square Thru 4 & Sides Rollaway
Swing Thru
Boys Run Right
Pass the Ocean
Girls Trade
All Eight Circulate
Swing Thru
Boys Trade
Swing Corner & Promenade Home

Creative sequence that is a nice Zero Module when you are in a Box 1-4:

Touch a Quarter
Scootback
Single Hinge
Girls Trade
Spin the Top
Spin the Top
Recycle

Perhaps you can only write choreography around a few basic and simple figures. Perhaps that is all you need and all your dancers need.  It’s never so black-and-white, in the end, but putting the two creative abilities together in choreography creation yields high-quality, conceptually brilliant choreographic ideas that will turn heads and impress all dancers on the floor.

Contact me if you have a question or you would like some help in learning how to create choreography.

Or call me to make square dancing part of your special event plans and set your group up for a fun and unique square dance party if you need a square dance caller!

Best Regards,

Shaun Werkele

303-250-4735

 

 

 

Mission Statement: The purpose of this post is to create a greater visibility of the square dance activity for future dance population growth on a national and local level. The coaching information provided here serves as a source for square dance caller education training and perspectives on dance. Future articles will be developed to improve the programs of square dancing and how those learning to square dance call can help contribute to the preservation of both modern western square dancing and traditional square dancing and to aid in the growth of the square dance activity.